Sonntag, 10. November 2013

Day #6 in Tokyo

Today I overslept a bit. Got woken up by a minor earthquake just a little shaking, nothing compared to an earthquake I had in Greece where it shooked so badly I was thrown out of the bed.

Because I wanted to see what would happen at the festival, I decided to have a long stroll along the Sumida river on the other side.

I walked down the path where during Cherry blossom watching season each place is taken by the viewers. Today it was me, some families airing out the kids and some guys jogging along. I always walk very quickly, don't know why, but there was an elder lady (maybe my mothers age) coming from behind and she was gone in light speed..
I looked into the oldest Dango store in town (expensive), some shrines and temples, a graveyard, wedding in a Shinto shrine with priest and maidens and I walked through a traditional japanese garden from a famous Samurai who lost his estate during Meiji Restauration. There were lots of homeless people in the park, napping on the stairs or the benches, something I have noticed in every small or bigger park - even in Ueno koen. Must be hard to live in such an expensive city.

Afterwards I went to the festival. They burned lots of incense in a huge burner. There was the float again and a huge crowd of people entering the temple and crowds outside buying charms. Around the temple there were food stores selling Yakisoba, dangos, Toriyaki, Okonomiyaki, Takoyaki, steamed sweet potatoes and so on. I made the mistake to buy a fish shaped wafer filled with red bean paste. It was good, but I was so stuffed, I could not eat anything more. There where guys holding speeches something about the nation, the future of the children - could not understand much and therefore left.
Later I strolled another area of Asakusa. Visited a temple with a famous big bell. Interesting shabby old and very small houses where suited next to the temple. Seemed to be some family owned crafts shops, one had a tiny barbershop inside. The advertisement looked as times stood still since 1964. I don't know why but I like those sceneries the best. Time capsules. Sadly they will be gone soon. I heart Asakusas old and shabby quarters will be erased from earth. There is a huge market for new housing projects. Reminds me on the Wudongs in Beijing. I think these old houses are not really comfortable but they have a certain charm and are part of the history. So it is kind of sad.
 Later I visited a bigger store specialized on pottery, where I have seen some very good looking plates for a resonable price, maybe I will go to the shop again and buy some. Found a shop specialized on Ghibli Animes, hesitated and bought some little souvenirs. On my way back I marched into a small family mart got me some Asahi black, egg salad sandwich and I am good for today.








Kommentare:

Hiroyuki hat gesagt…

Sounds like you had a slow day. No train or bus rides?
So, you had taiyaki 鯛焼き?
http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E3%81%9F%E3%81%84%E7%84%BC%E3%81%8D

Haven't you seen any chrysanthemum (kiku 菊) displays, festivals, and the like? It's the kiku season.

As for homeless people, I didn't see many of them 20 years ago, when I lived in Tokyo, if I remember correctly.

Fräulein Trude hat gesagt…

Yes, l have seen lots of chrysanthemums. Huge plants. At the Ryokan they have a very beautiful arrangement of Crysanthemums too. These huge chrysanthemums are grave or coffin decorations in my culture so it is a little bit strange (laugh). During autumn we like to have potted small blossomed chrysanthemums around the house. Slow day, I walked quite a lot, because my back did hurt a lot. Must have slept in a strange position.

Hiroyuki hat gesagt…

The Japanese love chrysanthemums. (The flower is used in the Imperial Crest.)

Even so, chrysanthemums are one of those flowers you shouldn't give to someone when you visit them in the hospital because of their associated with a funeral.
http://matome.naver.jp/odai/2135769615730477601
Sorry, Japanese only.

Fräulein Trude hat gesagt…

Funeral flowers... The same goes with big white lillies..

Sissi hat gesagt…

I am sorry I come so late (I have been travelling a lot... Rome, Bologna, Milan, Berlin, Nurnberg and Paris in hardly three weeks... and in a car). Anyway, I'm amazed you find time to write your Tokyo stay with such details!
OK, I'm catching up with the previous posts!
PS Don't think I'm crazy but I envy you the small earthquake... I always wish I experimented one... I cannot even imagine how it feels. There was a typhoon this year during my stay and it was a very unusual experience.

Fräulein Trude hat gesagt…

I had to experience two earthquakes, the first was very short and low scale (4.5) the second (2013/11/16, evening) was 5.0-5.5 and took 30 seconds and that made me a little bit worried. On TV (was suddenly switched on by hotel management) they showed the skyscrapers in Ginza shaking and a map with the centers of the tremors. They said: "don't worry, don't worry" and the announcer stood before the screen displaying the skyscrapers still rocking in realtime.. so I calmed down (laugh) - it was not the beginning of the big one...

Sissi hat gesagt…

An architect from my family said once that Japanese buildings are built in a special way to stand earthquakes. Foundations, etc., but most of all they are made to move and it makes them more difficult to fall down apparently.It must have been scary to see though I imagine!

Fräulein Trude hat gesagt…

Yes the buildings are safe as can be but I read some comments about the earthquake on some other sites and the poor guys sitting in one of the huge skyscrapers were not amused. The swaying is something special (laugh). The small building of the Ryokan did just some small swaying, shaking and rattling.

Hiroyuki hat gesagt…

There are three ways to deal with earthquakes:
1. Taishin 耐震, making the building robust enough to resist the earthquake
2. Seishin 制振 or 制震, damping the earthquake
3. Menshin 免震, isolating the building from the earthquake.

Fräulein Trude hat gesagt…

I read about some very elaborate techniques to damp down an earthquake, some sort of air-pockets/bags under the foundation of a building to be filled up with air in an instant depending on the seismic activities. Great!