Donnerstag, 5. Januar 2012

Tomatoe-Cheese-Onion-Bread

Today we had to face heavy weather. The winter storm was way to strong (peaks up to 100 km/h)  combined with rain, hail and lightning. It started during night and got worse in the afternoon.
I was glad I made it home by car unharmed. There was much debris on the road, especially in the woods and I had a few minutes where I could not see anything while riding down the motorway: the hail clashed horizontal into the windshield due to the strong storm. The storm shaked my car vividly and it was pitch black too. And finally, to add the cherry on the cake, the road was quickly covered with a thick layer of ice grains too, quite annoying. I decided not to drive to the bakery after reaching home. I simply had enough adventure for one day. Actually we had severe weather warnings for the day and now for the night too, it will be worse at our coastal region (storm surge predicted).
Staying home I decided to bake a bread for tomorrow morning.

This is a very nice bread for sandwichs with cheese or ham or sausage or just with a little butter with the typical soft texture:

 
500  g flour (for bread baking or allpurpose)
1 cube fresh yeast or instant yeast for 500 g flour
1 tablespoon sugar
1 tablespoon rice sirup
1  teaspoon salt
100 ml white wine, lukewarm
150 ml water, lukewarm
100 g cheese (swiss Appenzeller cheese or cheddar or medium aged gouda) grated + 2 tablespoons for topping
10 dried tomatoes preserved in olive oil, chopped / bigger chunks
1 tablespoon olive oil
4 tablespoons fried onions (home made or bought at asia stores)
2 tablespoons small bacon cubes
1 pinch smoked chilli powder

Stir crumbled yeast with sugar in lukewarm water. Add with wine and flour, salt, sirup, chilli, olive oil and grated cheese into your kitchen machine bowl and let run 10 minutes. Let the dough rise 1 hour. Add tomatoe chunks, onions, bacon and let the machine incorporate these just 1 minute or do it by hand.
Don't let the machine run too long. This would destroy the texture of the onions, bacon and tomatoes breaking them in smallest pieces.
Fill dough into a bread baking mould lined with parchment paper. Let rise again about 30 minutes.  Topp with grated cheese, make a shallow cut lengthwise.
Bake 10 minutes in the preheated oven at 200 degree Celsius and 4-50 minutes at 180 degree Celsius (or until golden brown). Make a tooth pick probe.

Kommentare:

Sissi hat gesagt…

Happy New Year, Kiki!
We have had exactly the same weather as you today. I was working at home and was scared my windows will break!
Your bread looks delicious. It reminds me a bit of my savoury cakes.

Fräulein Trude hat gesagt…

Yes, just like savory cakes but without egg and fat and no baking powder.

The storm is blowing on and on. Here is a picture of what happened near by - this is what I feared the most:

http://www.haz.de/var/storage/images/haz/hannover/fotostrecken-hannover/sturmtief-andrea-fegt-ueber-hannover/14/17454332-1-ger-DE/14_gallerylarge.jpg

There were 3 people in that car but they've got luck.

Hiroyuki hat gesagt…

I don't think I have ever experienced a storm at a speed of 100 km/h!

Looking at your blog, I can see that you are a very good baker! I wish I could find someone who is willing to bake bread for me...

I'm no baker, and I even don't have an oven...

Fräulein Trude hat gesagt…

I read lots of Japanese don't have an oven. I think this is because bread and cakes (made from wheat or rye flour) did not play any role in the nutrition for a long time and the kitchens are very small. Here it is different, baking is nothing special. Tradition calls for home made cake at least at sunday afternoon (called coffee or coffee and cake). In former times coffee and cake was the meal between lunch and supper. Nowadays at the office we still have a small coffee break at 2:30 with some cookies.

Hiroyuki hat gesagt…

Yes, that's one of the great differences between Japan and Western countries I learned when I was active on eGullet. There is hardly anyone in Japan that has an American-sized oven in their kitchen. When we talk about an oven, we usually mean a microwave oven with conventional oven features.
But I do not want to have an oven. I do have a toaster oven with which I can do a lot of cooking in a very short period of time. I think that a rice cooker and a toaster oven are required in every kitchen in Japan, while an oven is not.

Fräulein Trude hat gesagt…

Besides: Toaster ovens are nearly the same as an common european oven only smaller.

Sissi hat gesagt…

The photo does look scary! I'm happy I didn't have to travel yesterday.
I have already heard some Japanese saying that baking is extraordinary and difficult (my Japanese teacher for example) while I baked alone when I was a child... For my mum it was safer to let me bake than fry or cut food ;-)
If I were to live in Japan, the first think I would look for would be where to buy an oven then!
(Although, now that I have had a rice cooker for 4 years or more I couldn't live without this one either)

Fräulein Trude hat gesagt…

Sissi: True baking is not difficult but you have to be careful about preparing the ingredients, order to assemble everything, baking times, temperature. This is something many people don't like: strictly follow the rules or it will not work out.

Hiroyuki hat gesagt…

Besides, toaster ovens don't require preheating!