Montag, 5. Dezember 2011

Dried persimmons

I read about dried persiommons in Hiroyukis Blog and I just had to do the same ( I am a curious person concerning food and preparing food)  - and I did it. Last week I bought 3 kg persimmons at a cheap turkish supermarket. They tasted a little astringent. To prepare the fruits I peeled them first and dropped each fruit just for a few seconds in boiling water (to prevent quick rottening later on) -  and finaly hung them up: Outside under the roof of my house in the windy and fresh air.
This was not as easy as I thought. You cannot tie persimmons up if they don't have any stem with a "t-bone" left. I tried to stick them on a fishing line but the line cut through the fruit. So I tied them in small bags made from a long sheet of polyester fiber gauze. I am not sure if this will work out properly. It is just another weired culinary experiment and it looks quite funny too. I call it my very special outdoor Christmas decoration.
persimmons in little net bags.

Kommentare:

Sissi hat gesagt…

Your experiment looks very interesting! I would have never thought of substituting Hiroyuki's net with this polyester gauze. I am sure many people would take it for a Christmas decoration :-) You should put some glittering lamps on it!

Hiroyuki hat gesagt…

I hope your method will work out fine, but quite frankly, it may not work out, judging from my experience with a drying net, unless each persimmon gets enough flow of air all around it so that it is dried evenly all over the surface. It may be a better idea to first dry your persimmons to some degree in an oven at low temperature and then start drying them outdoors, on a fishing line (the persimmons should now be reduced in weight).

Fräulein Trude hat gesagt…

Hiroyuki,

at the moment they dry very fine - I check them on daily base. We have quite stormy weather and I have chosen a windy corner to hang them up. I hope this will do. Or it will end in a big failure. Oven method sounds good but it is very engergy consuming.

Hiroyuki hat gesagt…

What are going to do with the rest of your 3 kg persimmons? Are you going to dry them all? Do you have any German ways to remove astringency?? Japanese ways include using alcohol (the most common method), using carbon dioxide (commercial method), putting in a bath of warm water, and putting in a bag with an apple.

Fräulein Trude hat gesagt…

They are outside in the net bags.
I am still searching for another kind of persimmons. They are rather small, shaped flat round and taste in a firmer state very astringent. But this year I could not find any. Maybe they don't sell them anymore because they are so astringent. In former years I put these rather often together with apples. Same goes with green bananas: apples quicken the ripening process.
I found a gardening centre selling persimmon trees, first harvest in two years. Tempting.

Sissi hat gesagt…

I think I have a different kind of persimmons here. All come from Spain and I have bought one to test it: it's very sweet (not astringent) and frankly too bland for my fruit taste :-)
I will keep on searching for other varieties. I would love to find the astringent one. It certainly gives character.

Fräulein Trude hat gesagt…

Yes, they are rare. Most persimmons sold are Sharon fruits from spain. Sweet and plain as you mentioned. You need to find the fruits which leave a chemical aftertaste and numb hairy teeth/tongue feeling.